SOFT //

STEADY //

STRENGTH //

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A brief history, I started yoga when I was 14, became a yoga teacher at 21, began teaching in 2009 and have been teaching ever since. Yoga began as an off season activity I did to stay fit when I wasn’t playing basketball, volleyball or softball. When the time came that I stopped organised sports, yoga helped me to stay active and move on from my team sport identity. The yoga practice has always had a good effect on my body, but more importantly it has been a wealth of support for my mental wellbeing. It helped me first, through my parents divorce, then through moving internationally, having babies and now through a pandemic! 
 
So to be able to share this magic tool with others is truly a gift. Over the course of 10+ years my style and focus as a teacher has developed and changed, and below I’ve outlined how I find myself these days and what I am focusing on as a teacher:
 
I emphasise the connection and acceptance we each have to ourselves. I believe from a stronger acceptance and loving connection to ourselves, we can be more accepting, tolerant and loving to those around us. The classes I teach are very physically focused, but I like to take those gaps between asanas to inject some focus on mental wellbeing; and my hope is that each student walks away with results that positively affect them physically and mentally for the better.
 
“I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”
-Maya Angelou

As a teacher, I have taught the majority of my classes, in a heated room, guiding a large group of people through very strenuous postures for 90 minutes. An elusive element of this way of teaching that I hope to bring to one-to-one sessions, is the sense of satisfaction I witnessed at the end of these hot yoga classes. It was not only a sense of relief, but a great sense of calm and clarity.
 
The beauty of physical movement is it can take us out of our inner dialog, or expose that self talk which may or may not serve us. And in that transition of awareness, is an opportunity, a choice made present, to choose to stay the course, or change lanes, or stop all together- within our mental game. 

I found that possibility to access my inner mental game through yoga initially, but have returned to that same place, through sport, running, fitness classes, and most ways I move my body. But the love and appreciation toward yoga has not faded, and it's a big inspiration for all other training that I teach and practice today.

So whether you have been an avid yoga practitioner, or a gym rat, I hope we can work together, share a bit of joy in the movements our bodies and reach the next of our wellness and health journey goals together.